Boston waterfront with skyscrapers and bridge in the morning

Waterfront

Nestled between the North End and the Seaport District, the Waterfront neighborhood is steeped in rich history as it’s where the city first began. Discovered in 1614 by John Smith, the Waterfront once served as a vital port for America’s original 13 colonies. At one point in time, almost all foreign imports made their way through Boston Harbor!

Much like the North End, the Waterfront and its many wharfs have experienced new life since the completion of the Big Dig. The two-deck elevated overpass that once cut the Waterfront off from the rest of the city has since been moved underground, and in its place, the beautiful Rose Kennedy Greenway linear park emerged. Vacant warehouses and industrial buildings have since been converted in to full-service luxury buildings, with many units offering exposed brick, wooden beams and floor-to-ceiling windows that overlook the harbor. Waterfront residents bask in the light of their sun-drenched units, or go outside and enjoy an abundance of both public and private outdoor space.

The Waterfront is perhaps most recognizable by the Rowes Wharf Building, a Boston landmark. Famous for the its large arch that opens to the marina, the Rowes Wharf complex is also home to many restaurants, shops, offices, townhouses and the Boston Harbor Hotel. Also located in the Waterfront neighborhood is the New England Aquarium, the Boston Tea Party Museum and the Christopher Columbus Park. The Waterfront is served by excellent transportation alternatives, including direct access to I-93, I-90 and the MBTA Silver Line, which provides one-stop access in either direction to Logan Airport and South Station. The Waterfront is also only a stone’s throw from the MBTA Orange, Blue and Green Lines, and is walking distance to the North End, the Financial District and Government Center—making this an ideal location for the urban professional who wants to be near the hustle and bustle without sacrificing their waterfront views.