After growing up in East Boston and working in the neighborhood for the past decade, Angela D’Amore noticed something missing: a yoga studio.

“I definitely noticed it personally as a void in the neighborhood,” she says, “and I knew just from talking to people that that was a void that people wanted to be filled.”

D’Amore, a school teacher and longtime yoga practitioner, decided to do so herself. This weekend, she’ll welcome her first batch of students to the Point , East Boston’s first barre and yoga studio. (East Boston Meditation Center has offered yoga classes in the past, but public classes are currently on hold.)

The Point will offer a variety of barre and yoga classes for students of all levels, as well as Pilates classes, workshops, and events. Drop-in classes will cost an industry standard $16, though D’Amore says the studio will also host regular community and free classes.

This summer, for example, instructors will lead free classes in Piers Park every other Saturday morning. The Point will also host an open house weekend on June 10 and 11, offering three free classes per day so neighborhood residents can get a feel for the studio. A grand opening ceremony will follow in mid-July.

As finishing touches are put on the studio, D’Amore says she’s focused on keeping the Point a locally owned, locally centered community resource.

“I wanted to teach in East Boston to provide a service,” she says. “I look at the studio as an extension of that service, to bring this to the community and make it accessible to everyone who wants to walk through the door.”

‘LACK OF NEW RETAIL’: Developers are eyeing East Boston to build a 25,848-square-foot shopping plaza, above, for the Maverick Square neighborhood. Under the plans, a funeral home, along with three neighboring buildings would be razed.

A funeral home and three adjacent commercial buildings will have a date with the wrecking ball under plans for a new two-story, 25,848-square-foot retail building at the edge of East Boston’s Maverick Square.

Burlington’s Linear Retail Properties plans the project at Chelsea and Maverick streets, diagonally across from the MBTA’s Maverick Station, in a neighborhood shopping district.

The funeral home has been defunct for several years, and the existing buildings remain vacant with no historic significance to the neighborhood, Linear said in a Boston Planning & Development Agency filing.

“Growth and demand for housing in East Boston is at an all-time high, with an estimated 2,000 new units of housing either recently built, under construction or undergoing permitting,” the filing states. “As a result, there is a lack of new retail opportunities needed to serve the growing population in and around Maverick Square and Jeffries Point.”

1. 11 Fields Court #11, Melrose
Price: $415,000
Size: 1,000 square feet
Bedrooms: 2
Baths: 1.5


2. 181-183 Lamartine Street #2, Jamaica Plain
Price: $431,900
Size: 874 square feet
Bedrooms: 2
Baths: 1


3. 64 Greaton Road #1, West Roxbury
Price: $439,000
Size: 1,077 square feet
Bedrooms: 2
Baths: 1


4. 9 Sedgwick Street #3, Jamaica Plain
Price: $425,000
Size: 810 square feet
Bedrooms: 2
Baths: 1


5. 142 Lexington Street #3, East Boston
Price: $400,000
Size: 672 square feet
Bedrooms: 1
Baths: 1

 

The Suffolk Downs Festival of Racing included three days of racing in fall 2015.

A prominent local developer has agreed to buy Suffolk Downs in East Boston, a deal that could turn the down-on-its-luck horse track into a new neighborhood that transforms the northern corner of the city.

A group led by former Boston Redevelopment Authority chief Tom O’Brien has the 161-acre site under contract, according to people familiar with the situation, and a sale could close by summer. The agreement is preliminary and could fall through, the people said, but it’s the clearest sign yet of a new start for Suffolk after plans to build a casino there died in 2014.

 Neither O’Brien nor Suffolk partners would comment on the agreement, and no sale price was available. But observers say the site, which sits between two Blue Line stops and crosses partially into Revere, has enormous development potential for housing, retail, and open space.
“You look at it and say, ‘Wow, that is an unbelievable opportunity,’ ” said David Begelfer, chief executive of NAIOP Massachusetts, a real estate trade group. “You have enough critical mass to make something really great

 

The Institute of Contemporary Art is planning a major expansion — across the harbor in East Boston, in a large dilapidated industrial space once occupied by a copper pipe shop.

The museum’s new waterfront satellite will be filled with immersive artworks, and admission will be free to the public — a rarity in the Boston area. And if all goes according to plan, visitors will be able to dash there by water taxi from the ICA’s home base in the Seaport.

The $10 million renovation project will give the ICA an additional 15,000 square feet, mostly unvarnished space for artists to create works on a seasonal basis.

The addition of the long and narrow building — currently condemned — will increase the museum’s overall exhibition space by more than 50 percent.

It is scheduled to open in the summer of 2018 in the Boston Harbor Shipyard and Marina. Dubbed the “Watershed,” it will also house a small gallery dedicated to the history of the shipyard and a flexible gathering area with harbor views.

With East Boston booming, the Watershed museum space would join such public venues as KO Catering and Pies and the new Downeast Cider House in the shipyard area.

“There’s not a lot of raw industrial space for art in Boston,” said ICA director Jill Medvedow.  “This offers opportunities for artists to work differently, and for audiences to engage differently. That’s something we’re really eager to explore.”

Medvedow said the space will initially be open only in the warmer months “when the harbor is easy to traverse,” with the possibility of eventually opening year round.

“It’s experimental,” Medvedow said. “We’ll be working with a handful of artists over time, one per season. . . . I’m so engaged in this idea of different artists responding to the same site.”

Once a lonely outpost in the Seaport, the ICA has sought opportunities for years to expand beyond its current 65,000-square-foot building.

“We have this great building, but it’s relatively small,” said ICA board member Steve Corkin. “Jill articulated it years ago, a dream of how great it would be to expand across the harbor.”

The ICA attracted about 210,000 visitors last year. In 2015, the museum proposed — and then abandoned — an effort to expand into an adjacent office tower across the street in the bustling Seaport.

The museum has now signed a letter of understanding to take over the old copper pipe shop, and is working out the details of a five-year lease with Boston Harbor Shipyard and Marina, which manages the site for its owner, the Massachusetts Port Authority. Medvedow added that there will be opportunities to renew the lease, saying she believed “this is something that will continue for another decade at least.”

Joe Sugar, a partner in Boston Harbor Shipyard and Marina, said that while the site remains an active hub of maritime industries, the ICA’s cultural outpost is welcome.

“They’re the perfect fit for what we’re looking to do here,” said Sugar, who added that the museum won’t be paying market rate for the 1920s-era building. “Obviously, they’re putting a lot of money into the building, and we’re taking that into consideration.”

The ICA hopes to open the Watershed site in 2018 and operate it during the warmer months at first, with access by water taxi from the museum area.

Medvedow estimated that the renovation and programming costs for the initial five-year term would cost roughly $10 million, which she said the museum can raise without launching a formal capital campaign.

“I have every confidence we’ll be able to financially support this project,” Medvedow said. “The board will be able to champion this.”

Corkin, who chairs the ICA board’s real estate and building committee, said the board was “incredibly enthusiastic” about the new venture.

“It’s like a palpable excitement,” Corkin said. “We’re totally confident that we have the support and will raise the funds from our board and the broader community.”

The Watershed building, which still encloses remnants of the train tracks that formerly moved materials around the shipyard, will not deliver traditional white-wall gallery space. There will also be no cafe, though Medvedow said she was exploring pop-up ideas to offer light refreshments.

“It doesn’t offer the kind of expansion for making more gallery exhibitions or displaying our permanent collection,” said Medvedow, adding that the museum has been exploring “different modes of growth.”

Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh added his approval for the project, saying in a statement that it will “offer Boston a new, engaging space for art and discovery, and I welcome their investment in Boston’s diverse artists, residents and visitors.”

Before opening in 2018, the Watershed still needs to go through the permitting process, which Medvedow said would probably wrap up this summer. The museum has also engaged the Boston-area firm Anmahian Winton Architects to design the renovation of the building, which Sugar said has been unoccupied for the past 15-20 years.

“We want and need to make it safe,” Medvedow said. “But the intent is to maintain the industrial vocabulary of the space, to keep it as raw and open as possible — so it’s a small ‘d’ design.”

Medvedow said she was particularly excited about linking the ICA’s seaport location to East Boston via water taxi: “I’ve come to understand the harbor as the ICA’s front yard and East Boston’s front yard, so we’re neighbors.”

Joe Sugar, a partner in Boston Harbor Shipyard and Marina, toured the former copper pipe shop on Wednesday.

Clippership Wharf
4 Waterfront Proposals That Will Anchor East Boston’s Redevelopment

By Nick DeLuca | Saturday, August, 15, 2015

One could argue that East Boston not only has the best view of the city skyline, but it’s one of the most accommodating places to live. The MBTA Blue Line services the neighborhood, which is just a few stops from downtown, and it’s one of the most ethnically and culinary diverse communities. It’s also home to a growing artist enclave.

It comes as no real surprise then that one of Eastie’s most invaluable assets is poised for substantial transformation: the waterfront.

The Boston Redevelopment Authority has given approval to five residential developments that are expected to accommodate Boston’s surging population in locales in close vicinity to public transit.

To give you a sense of what to expect in coming years, here’s a quick breakdown of East Boston’s latest residential development proposals.

1. Clippership Wharf

Clippership Wharf

  • 12 acre parcel (including land and water)
  • 492 residential units, 278 condos and 214 apartments, totaling 525,000-square feet
  • 30,200-square feet of retail space
  • 6,000-square foot restaurant with patio space
  • 1,715 linear feet of Harborwalk
2. Boston East

Boston East

  • 200 residential units (26 on-site units to be affordable)
  • Harborwalk and Border Street linkage to the waterfront
  • 150 parking space garage
  • Office, retail space
3. Hodge Boiler Works

Hodge Boiler Works

  • 6-room bed & breakfast
  • 95 apartments
  • Roof top pavilion
  • Connection to LoPresti Park
  • Harborwalk improvements
  • 740-square foot cafe.
4. Coppersmith Village

Coppersmith Village

  •  1.3 acre land parcel
  • 3,000-square feet of retail/restaurant space overlooking Boston Harbor
  • 56 apartments (34 to be for 60 percent or below the average median income)
  • 15 townhouses (three at 80 percent or below AMI)
  • Across the street from Veteran’s Park
NewStreet_BatteryWharfView-thumb-thumb
Mapping the New Development in Busy, Busy East Boston

By Tom Acitelli | Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Few Hub enclaves are changing more than East Boston. The neighborhood has seen not only record-setting deals of late but lightning-fast ones as well. It’s also begun to benefit (or to suffer) from that curious Boston phenomenon of being the next It Neighborhood to welcome those priced out of the last It Neighborhood. Buyers and renters, in short, are easing their ways to Eastie to escape higher costs elsewhere. They have ever more options as our map of new development in the neighborhood demonstrates. Several hundred apartments, even condos, are slated or have recently opened in East Boston.

Screen Shot 2015-11-16 at 11.56.13 AM
East Boston’s New Development
1) 
 282 MARGINAL STREET
The nine-unit condo debuted in mid-2014. Asking prices have run from the low $400,000s to the upper $600,000s (and closing prices from the high $300,000s to the mid-$500,000s).
2) 
 135 BREMEN STREET
The Boston Redevelopment Authority approved this 94-unit apartment complex in November. Spreads will run from studios to 3-BRs; and the complex will come with 110 parking spaces and 100 bike spots.
3) 
 PORTSIDE AT EAST PIER
Building 7, the inaugural phase of the Portside at East Pier, debuted in November 2014. It includes 176 apartments and 192 parking spaces. The wider complex will include some 550 units.
4) 
 6 NEW STREET
The 259-unit, twin-towered apartment complex broke ground officially in December, though it’s been years in coming. It will include up to 155 parking spots as well as a new water-taxi dock.
5) 
 LOFTEL BOSTON
Nothing’s been O.K.’d yet, but there are plans to plunk 150 loft-like hotel rooms on a long-vacant building (with an additional two stories added for good measure). Rooms would average $200 a night or less.
6) 
 151 LIVERPOOL STREET
The pending proposal for 151 Liverpool Street would put up as many as two dozen apartments as well as 35 parking spots.
7) 
 HODGE BOILER WORKS
This big site is slated to have 95 apartments as well as a six-room bed and breakfast and a new marina building. There will also be parking for 75. The Boston Redevelopment Authority has O.K.’d it.
8) 
 CLIPPERSHIP WHARF
Some 400 condos are tentatively planned for this project, which the Boston Redevelopment Authority has signed off on. It’s also supposed to have plenty of retail and what the BRA calls “maritime support services.”
NewStreet_BatteryWharfView-thumb-thumb
East Boston’s Big New Street Project Officially Topping Off

By Tom Acitelli | Friday, November 13, 2015

East Boston is one of the more game-change-y neighborhoods in the entire region, not least because of new development. One of the biggest developments in the New New Brooklyn is the 4-acre project formerly known as 6-26 New Street and now dubbed 10 New Street. Portland, Ore.-based developer Gerding Edlen, the same folks behind Fort Point’s Factory 63 and 315 on A, hosted a groundbreaking for the complex back in December 2014. Now they’re hosting a topping-off this morning at 11:30.

Ten New will include up to 259 studio, 1-BR and 2-BR apartments in two buildings, one 16 stories, the other four; a new water-taxi dock; up to 155 parking spaces; and a 12-foot-wide extension of the Harbor Walk in that area. The development, designed by Copley Wolff and Stantec, with construction overseen by Suffolk, will also come with a rooftop terrace with its own pool. Stay tuned for rental info.

Click here for the full article on Curbed Boston

globe article oct 29

7 Surprising truths of the real estate boom

SIX YEARS AFTER THE DEPTHS OF THE GREAT RECESSION, NOT EVERYTHING IS AS YOU MIGHT EXPECT IN THE BOSTON MARKET.

By Keith O’Brien | October 29, 2015

At the low point of the Great Recession, in early 2009, talk around Boston was of foreclosures and fear. Six years later, the conversation has flipped. But not everything is what you might expect, says Cassidy Murphy of the Warren Group, a real estate tracking firm in Boston.

1. Over the last five years, the hottest condo market in Boston isn’t Jamaica Plain, or the Seaport, or Charlestown.

THE HOT CONDO MARKETS

Median Condo Sales prices, 2015 vs. 2010

> Dorchester +128.2%

> East Boston +64.9%

> Allston +50.4%

> South Boston +50.3%

> Chelsea +42.4%

Dorchester’s boom is due in part to simple market economics. “Dorchester started really low,” Murphy says. In 2010, median sales prices of condos were only at $149,000. This year, they’ve jumped to $340,000. “Dorchester,” Murphy says, “has the same things that everybody wants. It’s got amenities and transportation. It’s located close to [downtown] Boston.”

2. Last year, more condos sold in Cambridge than any other Greater Boston community (except Boston itself). But its 98 percent increase in median sales price since 2000 doesn’t even put it at the top of this list.

THE BEST INVESTMENTS 

Median Condo Sales prices, 2015 vs. 2000 

> East Boston +281%

> Dorchester +172%

> Brighton +141.3%

> Jamaica Plain +117.5%

> Brookline +115.6%

“East Boston has had a lot of inventory come online,” Murphy says. And seen an influx of artists. “They say to see where gentrification happens next, you follow the artists,” she says. “If you want to know what’s hot next, find out where they’re all hanging out.”

3. These 10 popular suburbs saw median home sales prices rebound the fastest after the recession. (Note: Boston, Somerville, Cambridge, and Brookline excluded.)

THE TEFLONS 

Median Home Sales prices, 2015 vs. 2005 

> Newton +47.4%

> Arlington +35.2%

> Lexington +31.9%

> Needham +28.1%

> Concord +26.9%

> Watertown +24.4%

> Winchester +23.7%

> Wellesley +23.6%

> Bedford +22.1%

> Belmont +18.1%

“These are towns that have done well and will always do well,” Murphy says. But they can’t keep rising like this forever. “It’s a gradual coming back and the numbers get bigger and better every year,” she says. “But at some point, it plateaus.”

4. Median home sales, comparing 2015 with 2010, are up in many Greater Boston communities, even in those not historically considered hot spots.

THE REBOUNDERS

Median home sales, 2015 vs. 2010 

> Everett +36.4%

> Lynn +31.8%

> Malden +30.4%

> Revere +25.5%

> Lowell +20.8%

“We’re seeing people moving out from the city and wanting to still be

closer to the city,” Murphy says. “And that moves into some of those less traditional towns.”

5. But the prices in those five places — while significantly higher than 2010 — still have not returned to 2005 levels.

THE REBOUNDERS, A LONGER VIEW

Median home sales prices, 2015 vs. 2005 

> Lowell -16.5%

> Revere -14.7%

> Everett -12.3%

> Lynn -12.1%

> Malden -3.7%

In this way, the impact of the Great Recession still lingers in many places near Boston. “There was more job loss, more wage stagnation, more problems being able to save money,” Murphy says. “So when you start low, and fall lower, it’s hard to come back to low.”

6. In these 10 communities, median home sales prices are down by more than 20 percent compared with a decade ago.

THE HARD FALLS 

Median home sales prices, 2015 vs. 2005 

> Fairhaven -26.3%

> North Attleborough -25.3%

> Brockton -24.9%

> Westport -23.6%

> New Bedford -22.9%

> Halifax -22.6%

> Somerset -22.4%

> Lawrence -21.7%

> Rehoboth -21.5%

> Whitman -20.7%

7. In the end, the boom appears to be very localized. In three of the six Boston-area counties, median sales prices are down compared with 2005. They have not returned to pre-crash prices. And they are only up significantly in one place: Suffolk County.

THE COUNTIES ON THE MOVE 

Median Home Sales prices, 2015 vs. 2005

> Suffolk County +10.7%

> Middlesex County +4.6%

> Norfolk County +0.5%

> Essex County -5.2%

> Plymouth County -10.4%

Bristol County -20.4%

Click here to view this article in the Boston Globe Magazine…

Globe Oct 29

COLLEGE STUDENTS LATEST WAVE TO EMBRACE EAST BOSTON

By Laura Krantz | GLOBE STAFF 

WENDY MAEDA/GLOBE STAFF
Suffolk University senior Megan Post lives with two roommates in an East Boston apartment onHavre Street.

You can tell that East Boston is changing if you stand long enough at the Maverick T stop, where for years an escalator has delivered tired blue-collar workers back home at the end of long workdays.

But now, a new demographic is stepping off that moving staircase. College students, along with young professionals, have begun to trickle into the neighborhood, and many longtime residents find themselves squeezed out.

It’s not quite Allston yet, but Eastie is quickly becoming a destination for students, drawn by cheaper rents, quick public transportation, and quiet streets.

The number of students living in East Boston grew by 115 percent between 2006 and 2013, the latest year that complete city data are available. That makes it one of the fast-growing neighborhoods for students, along with Roxbury, Mission Hill, and the Downtown Crossing/Chinatown area.

The housing journey of Suffolk University junior Brianna Silva encapsulates the neighborhood’s newfound popularity.

After her sophomore year, Silva wanted the freedom of living off campus. Her excitement evaporated when she visited an apartment for rent in the North End. The kitchen was in the living room. The bedrooms barely fit a person. “You’re paying $2,500 to live uncomfortably,” said Silva, a Florida native who studies journalism.

Instead, this fall she and two roommates moved into a three-bedroom in a three-decker in East Boston near the Airport MBTA stop that costs $2,300 and has a real kitchen, separate living room, and big bedrooms. It takes her 20 minutes to get to Suffolk, door to door.

Neighborhood groups say that as developers seize on this demand from young people, they are forcing out longtime residents, many immigrants, who have called East Boston home for decades. The phenomenon has transformed such neighborhoods as Allston, Brighton, and Mission Hill.

The average monthly rent in East Boston has risen from $1,204 in 2005 to $2,070, according to Rental Beast, an online apartment listing service.

A mile down the street from Silva’s apartment, a group of longtime East Boston residents gathers every Wednesday night in the basement of a Paris Street church. At a recent meeting, many brought their children and some carried folders with pieces of wrinkled paper: eviction notices. You can tell that East Boston is changing if you stand long enough at the Maverick T stop, where for years an escalator has delivered tired blue-collar workers back home at the end of long workdays.

But now, a new demographic is stepping off that moving staircase. College students, along with young professionals, have begun to trickle into the neighborhood, and many longtime residents find themselves squeezed out.

It’s not quite Allston yet, but Eastie is quickly becoming a destination for students, drawn by cheaper rents, quick public transportation, and quiet streets.

The number of students living in East Boston grew by 115 percent between 2006 and 2013, the latest year that complete city data are available. That makes it one of the fast-growing neighborhoods for students, along with Roxbury, Mission Hill, and the Downtown Crossing/Chinatown area.

The housing journey of Suffolk University junior Brianna Silva encapsulates the neighborhood’s newfound popularity.

After her sophomore year, Silva wanted the freedom of living off campus. Her excitement evaporated when she visited an apartment for rent in the North End. The kitchen was in the living room. The bedrooms barely fit a person. “You’re paying $2,500 to live uncomfortably,” said Silva, a Florida native who studies journalism.

Instead, this fall she and two roommates moved into a three-bedroom in a three-decker in East Boston near the Airport MBTA stop that costs $2,300 and has a real kitchen, separate living room, and big bedrooms. It takes her 20 minutes to get to Suffolk, door to door.

Neighborhood groups say that as developers seize on this demand from young people, they are forcing out longtime residents, many immigrants, who have called East Boston home for decades. The phenomenon has transformed such neighborhoods as Allston, Brighton, and Mission Hill.

The average monthly rent in East Boston has risen from $1,204 in 2005 to $2,070, according to Rental Beast, an online apartment listing service.

A mile down the street from Silva’s apartment, a group of longtime East Boston residents gathers every Wednesday night in the basement of a Paris Street church. At a recent meeting, many brought their children and some carried folders with pieces of wrinkled paper: eviction notice.

globe oct 29

WENDY MAEDA/GLOBE STAFF
Long-time renters at 64 Lubec St., at right, in East Boston were recently evicted. The landlord will renovate and search for new tenants.

As developers buy real estate, some have issued eviction notices to entire buildings, ordering residents to leave or pay up to $1,000 more per month, according to attorneys who work with the advocacy group City Life/Vida Urbana to help residents fight evictions.

Prices at local stores and restaurants have risen. Tacos in the restaurants along Meridian Street that used to cost $1 now cost $3, according to one resident. Students don’t contribute to the neighborhood the way longtime residents do, they said.

Still, residents don’t blame their new young neighbors. “They’re just trying to find an affordable place to live, like the rest of us,” another said.

They blame developers and politicians, whom they are lobbying for a law that would bar evictions without cause.

“It’s affecting us a lot. It’s changing too much. Our roots are here,” said Hortencia Martinez, who has lived in East Boston for 20 years with her husband, Gabriel. The couple lives on Lubec Street in a small apartment building whose value risen 43 percent in the last decade, according to city records. Developer Alex Hodara bought the building in February along with an adjacent property for $1.3 million and is seeking to evict the tenants, they said. Hodara has purchased at least 18 buildings in East Boston this year and owns at least 27 others, including the one where Silva lives on Monmouth Street, according to a database kept by City Life/Vida Urbana.

Hodara did not respond to requests for comment.

East Boston has been a haven for immigrants since the 1800s, when the neighborhood was created by filling in five islands in Boston Harbor. Waves of Canadian and Irish immigrants gave way to Russians, Eastern European Jews, and Italians.

Today’s residents come mostly from Central and South American countries and many work blue-collar jobs.

Hodara’s company website caters to a younger crowd. A promotional video for Living Eastie, the name posted on his buildings, features a young white woman, “Alexandra,” jogging through a mostly deserted East Boston. The video features only one person of color, her CrossFit coach. The company’s website features the slogan “East Boston has arrived.”

Not everyone balks at the changing neighborhood. Longtime East Boston realtor Anthony Giacalone called the influx of new residents a natural evolution, and said when buildings change hands and are renovated, it is normal for rents to rise.

The total number of students in East Boston grew to 1,341 in 2013 from 625 in 2006, according to data colleges submit annually to the city. The 2014 numbers, while available, are calculated differently making them near impossible to compare.

There is chatter about Suffolk University’s plans for the area. The college in July announced it will use the sports fields in East Boston Memorial Park, and Suffolk officials last week said they are talking with developers about building more dorms somewhere in Boston.

Mayor Martin J. Walsh has asked schools to build a total of 18,500 new dorm beds by 2030 with the goal of freeing up 5,000 units of housing citywide.

Meanwhile, talk about gentrification is not lost on students. Discussion simmers on the popular East Boston Open Discussion Facebook page.

“I see more people like me, students and professionals, moving in,” Emerson College graduate student AJ Park said in a recent phone interview.

globe oct 29

WENDY MAEDA/GLOBE STAFF
Brianna Silva, a junior at Suffolk University, is seen in the bedroom of her East Boston apartment on Monmouth Street.

Megan Post, a Weymouth native and senior at Suffolk, lives with Taylor Cole and a third roommate on Havre Street. They pay $750, $800 and $850 depending on the size of the bedroom, still cheaper than the approximately $1,300 per month (plus meal plan) for a dorm at Suffolk, which doesn’t guarantee students housing after their first year.

Cole has lived in East Boston for two years. On her first move-in day, she said, she didn’t see any students. On Sept. 1 this year, things were different. “I’d say it’s definitely being gentrified, and pretty much everyone knows that,” Cole said.

Sal LaMattina, a city councilor who represents the neighborhood, said he watched the same changes in the North End and anticipated it would eventually happen to East Boston. “If [students] move there I hope they get involved in the neighborhood, maybe volunteer in the Boys and Girls Club,” LaMattina said.

Click here to view this article in the Boston Globe…